It's safer in earthquakes, too

"Trying to be happy by accumulating possessions is like trying to satisfy hunger by taping sandwiches all over your body." - George Carlin

Happy Discardia, everybody! The weeks around the solstices are when we discardians let go of whatever is not adding value to our lives. Sometimes it's a shirt that looked great in the store but now hangs funny. Sometimes it's a habit like compulsively checking for traffic on my blog posts. Sometimes it's a person who is raining on my parade.

This year I'm letting go of a lot of assumptions about business that I made when I was a youngling in San Francisco. That was more than a decade ago and I was fresh off the bus, so it's time to retire those lessons about how to build value and culture and approach the process with new eyes.

I'm finally letting go of my huge oak desk, too. For years it hosted a lively ecosystem of paper and electronic mechanisms for thought and business, but I've converted all of that into a tiny laptop and a file box in a closet. Now that trusted wooden friend is in the garage, awaiting donation.

Later this week the kid and I will do a sweep of the house, looking for things which we haven't used in a year and putting them in piles to toss or donate. Her brain is changing so quickly that toys become uninteresting long before they lose their emotional weight. She was into the idea that those toys would get love from another kid instead of gathering dust on her shelf. That helps me, too.

Do you have a thing, habit, person, or idea which is no longer adding value to you life?

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